About the LFNW Videos

I just wanted to post a little background about the videos I recorded from LFNW 2010.

I recorded them with a Samsung SC-MX20 which is a very inexpensive / budget rig. The sound quality is fair to good considering the camera does not have the ability to use an external mic. The video quality is fair to good considering that most of the rooms had the lights turned off for viewing projected presentation slides. The videos are unedited and I did not bother to even add title slides mainly because I wanted to stick with Linux apps for production and I have yet to find a reasonable video editor. Yes, I've tried them all and they either have issues with audio export or want to transcode the video resolution to something other than the original size.

The videos were recorded at 720x480 resolution and where transcoded with a combination of Handbrake and ffmpeg2theora... with the final results being in Ogg Theora (.ogv) format.

The videos were uploaded to archive.org and are streaming (and downloadable) from there.

In the HTML 5 video tag I used to embed the videos I used a resolution of 512x288 to avoid forcing horizontal scrolling. Starting with the 3.6 series of Firefox you can play videos full-screen but it is recommended that you simply right-click on the videos and "Save Video As..." to download a local copy and user your preferred video player for best performance and quality.

For those with browsers that don't support the HTML 5 video tag nor Ogg Theora video, you are out of luck. Feel free to download the individual files and play them back with VLC.


Video: LFNW2010 - Linux Server Hardening

| |

Linux Server Hardening Tips and Techniques by Gary Smith.

Video: LFNW2010 - RHEL Automation with SystemBuilder

| | |

Automating Configuration, Deployment and Maintenance for Red Hat and CentOS by Kay Williams from Rendition Software.

Video: LFNW2010 - Hack this Site

| |

Hack this Site or Learn How Anyway by Andrew Becherer.

Video: LFNW2010 - Fedora 13 Sneak Peek

| |

What's under the hat? A sneak peek at Fedora 13 by Jesse Keating.

Video: LFNW2010 - Don't Custom Build that Site!

| |

Don't custom build that site! The many uses for Drupal by Jakob Perry.

Video: LFNW2010 - Git er done with GIT

| |

Here's the video of Jesse Keating's introduction to git.

Video: LFNW2010 - Intro to SELinux, Part 2

| |

This is is the second hour of the two hour Intro to SELinux presentation by Hal Pomeranz.

Please note, my battery died with about 10 minutes to go so the last bit of the presentation is missing. Sorry!

Video: LFNW2010 - Intro to SELinux, Part 1

| |

This is is the first hour of the two hour Intro to SELinux presentation by Hal Pomeranz.

Func: Fedora Unified Network Controller

|

I recently started using a tool that I find very handy. It is named func and it is a remote api for management, configuration, and monitoring of systems. What does that mean exactly? I'll get into that but first a little background.

In my day job I manage a number of Linux systems. Some are servers and more are desktop machines in labs used by students. All of the lab machines are triple-boot (Windows XP Pro, CentOS 5.4, and Fedora 12). Fedora has a lot of updates... and it is hard to keep up with them. Typically I have to ssh into each machine to work on it but most of what I do is the same thing over and over again. Wouldn't it be nice to be able to manage multiple machines at once with one command line? That is what func does for you. func allows you to manage remote machines with one command line in parallel.

func was written by Fedora developers mainly to help them manage the server infrastructure that makes up the Fedora distribution's online public servers and build systems. They have an active mailing list that you are encouraged to participate in if you are interested in asking questions and helping to shape the future development of func.

func is written in Python and comes with a number of modules that are custom built for certain tasks. If there is an existing module for your task(s), use the existing module. If not, you can use the command module which basically allows you to run whatever command(s) you want on your remote machines.