OpenVZ

First OpenVZ installation

|

This weekend I finally got around to checking out OpenVZ. With lots of prodding from Scott, not to mention lots of help from Scott, I got this thing installed rather quickly. I pretty much followed Scott's latest article Intro to OpenVZ: Part II. I started with installing CentOS 4.4 using the custom minimalist install and updated everything. BTW this machine is an old Dell 2Ghz with 512MB RAM and 40GB drive.


New OpenVZ Stable Kernel Released

| |

The OpenVZ development team sent out a email today announcing the availability of kernel-2.6.9-023stab037.3. The main difference was stated as:

In-kernel sysfs/uevent layer is now updated to be compatible with FC5 and SLES10 userland.

What that means, I believe, is that whenever one tried to create a VPS of a distro that expects a newer kernel than 2.6.9, that distro would get very cranky... so installing FC5 and SLES10 VPSes used to require using the OpenVZ testing kernel based on 2.6.18. With this kernel upgrade, that no longer seems to be the case. Since I don't have any FC5 nor SLES10 VPSes, I haven't tested this out. Hmm, I wonder if FC6 as a VPS is supported yet?

After looking at a lot of the changes on the changelog page, there seems to be a lot of fixes. I've updated my OpenVZ Host machines and rebooted and it seems to be running nicely... but one always has to watch /var/log/messages on the Host OS as well as /proc/user_beancounter on the VPSes.

I think I have all of my VPSes tuned up well enough because I haven't noticed any failcnt increments in some time.


Introduction to OpenVZ, Part 1

| |

Users Guide PDFUsers Guide PDFI got contacted by SearchServerVirtualization.com to write an article about OpenVZ, and like... it was actually a paying gig. :) In the article I introduce OpenVZ as well as explain the process container form of virtualization. Obligatory quote:

There are a number of virtualization products for Linux and while I have used a number of them, the one that best fits my needs is OpenVZ. OpenVZ uses a form of virtualization called "process containers." OpenVZ is not a hardware emulator nor a virtual machine but a form of operating system-level virtualization that offers a way of grouping processes (running programs or system services) together to create a Virtual Environment (VE) or a Virtual Private Server (VPS).


Syndicate content