kvm

How to run Windows 11 in a KVM virtual machine

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 11/12/2021 - 10:03

First of all... "What!?!  An article about Microsoft Windows on this Linux oriented website?!?!"  Yes.  Hey, I'm running Windows 11 as a KVM virtual machine on my Dell Latitude E6440 laptop that is 6+ years old... using Fedora 35 as my VM Host.  I don't think Windows 11 would want to run on the physical hardware either... but the method I mention should make it work in many places that it would refuse to because of hardware requirements enforced by the installer.

Make sure when creating the VM (I did so using virt-manager), to make it a UEFI-based VM and not Legacy BIOS and giving it at least 4GB of RAM.  When the installer gets to the point where it tells you that your PC does not meet the hardware configuration requirements, do the following:

1) Hit shift-F10 on the keyboard which will bring up a command prompt
2) From the command line, run "regedit"
3) Under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup add a new item named "LabConfig"
4) Within the newly created LabConfig item, make two DWORD entries setting their values both to hex 1
     BypassTPMCheck and BypassSecureBootCheck
5) Exit regedit, close the command window and back in the installer, hit the left arrow in the top left of the window (do not click on the X at the top right).  That will back up a step in the installer, and you can go Next again, and it will no longer complain about your hardware.

Once the install is done make sure to install the Windows guest tools from spice-space.org... and then you'll get higher resolutions and improved performance.

Will this problem ever crop up again?  I'm not sure but I can tell you it still worked after applying all of the available updates including a cumulative update.  Good luck.

Proxmox VE - Upgrade from 6.4 to 7.0

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Tue, 08/10/2021 - 09:31

A while ago I decided to take the plunge by upgrading the 5-node Proxmox VE cluster at work from the 6.4 version (based on Debian 10) to the new 7.x version (based on Debian 11).  Debian hasn't made a GA release of 11 yet so some thought it curious that Proxmox would release PVE 7.4 to GA.

How was the upgrade process?  Proxmox VE is a very light-weight system and doesn't use a whole lot of packages so it was a very easy upgrade process.  Historically, Debian is one of the most pain-free upgrades among the Linux distributions.  PVE does have some advanced features but I'm not using any of them...  no ZFS, no Ceph distributed storage, etc.  All of my VMs use a qcow2 disk image file stored on an standard partition formatted with XFS.   I'm not currently using a lot of containers (mostly VMs) so the switch from cgroups v1 to v2 didn't impact me.  They do have good documentation on the upgrade process as well as a software tool named pve6to7.  I ran pve6to7 and it found no issues.  I backed up all of my VMs and upgraded the first host without incident and then did all of the other hosts one-by-one until they were all complete.  I haven't noticed any issues post upgrade.  There have been quite a number of updates since the upgrade but I'm guessing that is fairly normal as Debian 11 approaches GA release.

What's new in 7.x?  Not a whole lot... at least not in this, the initial release.  The big change is the move to a newer version of Debian... which I imagine was quite some work.  I'd expect them to add more new substancial features in future 7.x releases.  I do post a video below from them showing the main new features in 7.x so far.  Enjoy!

Video: Using Cockpit for KVM Virtual Machine Management

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Thu, 12/13/2018 - 12:48

Cockpit has been in development for a few years now and it appears it is going to be default in the upcoming RHEL8 release.  I've recently started using it for managing and accessing KVM virtual machines via the cockpit-machines package.  I made a short screencast showing the basics.  Enjoy.

Video: KVM Forum 2016 - Painless Switch to KVM

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 09/02/2016 - 16:46

Yep, I'm a big OpenVZ guy.  OpenVZ 7 just came out at the end of July.  It added KVM virtual machines in addition to OpenVZ containers.  That was a big change considering the commercial product OpenVZ came from (PCS  - Parallels Cloud Server v6) used a proprietary hypervisor.  Den Lunev, who has worked on this stuff for 15+ years (SWsoft, Parallels, and now Virtuozzo) spoke about everything that went into moving to KVM in Virtuozzo 7 / OpenVZ 7 at the KVM Forum last week.  Enjoy! (PDF Slide Deck)

Video: KVM within KVM, aka Nested

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 04/01/2016 - 13:51

A few of us were talking about VDI and KVM in IRC and our buddy kaptk2 told me that nested KVM was working pretty well these days... since Fedora 19 he said.  I had not tried it yet so I thought I'd give it a try.  It worked so well that I thought I'd make a screencast showing it off. The original recording size was 1920x1080 (plus titlebar) and I scaled it down to 1280x734... so full-screen it for a better view beyond the embedded 824x473 video.  Oh, and yes SELinux is enabled and in enforcing mode everywhere.  Umm, and NO, this is NOT an April fools joke!

There is a tiny bit of work to do to get it going but not much.  Add a kernel boot parameter and configure the CPU details for the VM.  For more info, see this:
https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_to_enable_nested_virtualization_in_KVM


nested-kvm-on-fedora-23.webm (21 minutes, 21.5 MB)