Fedora

Video: Recording a screencast within an LXC container

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 22:00

I took the GUI Fedora 26 container I made in the previous video and decided to see if I could do screencasting within the container.  Seems to work just fine.  I think the microphone would have worked within the container if I hadn't been using it on the host to record the video on the host of recording a video within a container.  Inception all over again.  Enjoy!

Higher resolution / quality downloadable version:
lxc-screencasting-20170908.webm (4m:34s, 35.2MB)

Video: LXC, from Start to Finish

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 21:14

LXC is a native form of containers available in the mainline Linux kernel for several years now.  Unlike Docker, LXC provides a full "system" container and can even be used for GUI desktop environments.

In this video I show how to install and setup LXC on a Fedora 26 host as well as how to create your first container (also Fedora 26) which is very minimal... and how to build it up via package manager to a complete GUI container including video and audio playback accessed via the x2go remoting protocol that runs over ssh.

I have also made GUI containers of other distributions including CentOS 7, Ubuntu 16.04, Debian 9, and OpenSUSE 42.3... using the pre-made OS Templates shown listed in the video... using their native packages managers, mostly the same packages, and all running systemd and accessible via x2go.

Screencast recorded under Fedora 26 with simplescreenrecorder from the rpmfusion repository.

I did make a few minor mistakes and typos along the way, but making mistakes is how we learn, right?

Higher resolution / quality downloadable version:
lxc-start-to-finish-20170908.webm (34m:19s, 196MB)

Fedora Release Time: Welcome F26

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Sat, 07/08/2017 - 18:40

There was a GO / NO GO meeting earlier in the week and the Fedora 26 RC 1.5 build passed.  As a result Fedora 26 will be officially released on Tuesday, July 11th.  According to the original schedule, F26 was set to be released on June 6th.  It got bumped 5 times during the alpha and beta phases but that pretty much always happens to this distro that is constantly leading the pack with innovation. 

What are the new features?  Check out the release notes and/or the changeset.  There are quite a few changes to the installer. Just be aware there are a ton of normal updates beyond the changeset and I mean... how about that new desktop background?  LXQT users will also be happy to have their own Spin now.  Don't forget that Fedora appears to be supporting quite a few arches, some as primary and others as secondary.  Not as many as Debian and Gentoo but still.  Which arches?  aarch64, armhfp, i386, ppc64, ppc64le, and x86_64.  I'm only using the later myself.

I've been using Fedora 26 since before the alpha release.  How is that?  For many years now they have been producing nightly-builds if you knew where to look.  I just took one of the nightly builds and did an install... and then crawled along updating all the way through alpha and beta to final.  I mainly start early because I like to build my own remix with all of the desktop environments installed and the earlier I start the longer I have to work on perfecting it to my own tastes.  Here's some instructions if you have any desire to make your own spin or remix.  About the time the beta came out I started running F26 on my laptop and work machine exclusively.  It has been stable for me the entire time.

My main home server machine is always the last to move to a new release and I just upgraded to F26 from F25 today.  Since I have a lot of packages installed it did take a while.  Let it be known that rpmfusion has had packages for F26 since around the alpha release and as a result I was able to just upgrade everything and not have to worry about removing much because third-party packages were missing... because they weren't.  For a long time I have been a fan of clean installs but with the home server I have a particular application installed that has to pull down a ton of data post install if I were to do a clean install (plexmediaserver)... so I've been upgrading that machine with each release for quite a few releases now.  Upgrades for me have been completely painless for several releases now.  It helps when Linux / Fedora likes your hardware and you aren't using any proprietary drivers (no nVidia here).

Fantastic job Fedora Project!  I also wanted to give a shout out to the fine fellows that make up the Respin SIG.  They have been providing updated iso media for all of the Fedora Spins (including Workstation) for several releases now and generally make new ones every other kernel update, which in Fedora is quite often.  I'm not sure everyone knows about the periodic refreshed media that they provide because they are mainly only promoted on Fedora Planet and the Fedora IRC channel.  Keep up the good work!  There are a ton up post-release updates for Fedora 26 already so I'm sure they'll be getting to work on refreshed F26 media RSN.

FedBerry 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Sat, 01/21/2017 - 19:24

FebBerry LogoI've been running FedBerry 24 on my Rasperry Pi 3 for some time now.  It has been hooked up to the HDTV in the back bedroom.  While I don't use it on a daily basis, I do try to login to it once a week or so and keep it updated... and reboot whenever there is a kernel update. Given the rate of Fedora updates and frequent FedBerry kernel updates, the project is fairly active.

What is FedBerry?  FedBerry is a Fedora-remix made by three guys who have built glue packages for Fedora's ARM release and produced a few different images for the RPi 2 and Pi 3.  Download the .tar.xz, decompress and write it to a microSD card, insert card into Raspberry Pi... and snap... you have Fedora.  They started with Fedora 23, are on Fedora 24 now, and fairly recently released packages for Fedora 25... although no images for Fedora 25 yet.

As I write this, I'm in the middle of upgrading my F24 system to F25.  The number of packages the FedBerry folks have to produce is pretty small.  They are mostly related to the kernel and various branding packages.  It really isn't that far away from Fedora's ARM build.  Fedora has said that they are working on getting a release to run on the Raspberry Pi but historically there have been a few roadblocks that over time have been dissolving.  The main ones were with kernel support that wasn't in mainline and/or proprietary and the use of the FAT filesystem for the boot partition... or something like that.  I read a few blog posts on it a couple of months ago but don't remember the exact details.

Anyhoo, I run XFCE and a host of other common desktop software on the RPi3 and it works great.  While it is no speed demon, all of the hardware works including the wifi.  I can ssh into it and even connect to it via x2go for a remote XFCE session.  Overall, I'm very impressed with FedBerry.

I will update this post with info on how the upgrade went.  The FedBerry devs didn't announce their F25 packages, or at least not that I saw, but I noticed a 25 directory on their repo site and thought I'd stick my neck out.  If it fails on me, it would really be my fault for being a earlier-than-early adopter... but so far it seems to be working.

Update: The upgrade went fine.  Rebooted and had a 4.9.2 Linux kernel. FB24 had 4.4.41.  All the hardware continues to work fine.  Thanks FedBerry!

The method I used was: dnf system-upgrade download --nogpgcheck --releasever=25 followed by dnf system-upgrade reboot

Video: KVM within KVM, aka Nested

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 04/01/2016 - 13:51

A few of us were talking about VDI and KVM in IRC and our buddy kaptk2 told me that nested KVM was working pretty well these days... since Fedora 19 he said.  I had not tried it yet so I thought I'd give it a try.  It worked so well that I thought I'd make a screencast showing it off. The original recording size was 1920x1080 (plus titlebar) and I scaled it down to 1280x734... so full-screen it for a better view beyond the embedded 824x473 video.  Oh, and yes SELinux is enabled and in enforcing mode everywhere.  Umm, and NO, this is NOT an April fools joke!

There is a tiny bit of work to do to get it going but not much.  Add a kernel boot parameter and configure the CPU details for the VM.  For more info, see this:
https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_to_enable_nested_virtualization_in_KVM


nested-kvm-on-fedora-23.webm (21 minutes, 21.5 MB)

Video: Comparing Fedora 23 and Korora 23 (Cinnamon)

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Wed, 03/30/2016 - 17:13

A user with the IRC nick of CoffeeMan wanted to know how Fedora 23 and Korora 23 (Cinnamon edition) compared for resource usage because he was seeing performance differences between the two.  There shouldn't really be much in the way of differnces other than branding and themes... so I created two KVM VMs and installed them both side-by-side.  While I realize that running two VMs at the same time isn't really that bright when it comes to getting accurate performance metrics, it at least gives one an idea how of they compare... and things like the number of processes, CPU usage, RAM used, disk used, etc... shouldn't really vary that much.

While it is a fairly boring, not-much-action video, at least it is small.  28+ minutes at about 16.4 MB.  It is 200Kbit (variable bit-rate) with no audio with a resolution of 1280x491 at 25FPS.  Not too bad.  I have made the default size in the browser be 824x316 so go full screen for a much better view.

fedora23-vs-korora23-resource-usage.webm (28.5 minutes - 16.4 MB)

Video: Fedora 23 LXC - Debian SID and CentOS 7 XFCE containers via X2Go

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Sun, 02/07/2016 - 17:21

Being a LONG-TIME OpenVZ user, I've been avoiding LXC some. Mainly because it wasn't quite done yet. I thought I'd give it a try on Fedora 23 to see how well it works... and the answer is surprisingly... fairly well. I made two screencast (without sound). I just used the lxc-{whatever} tools rather than virt-manager. Both containers just use the default network config (DHCP handed out via DNSMasq provided by libvirtd) which is NAT'ed private addresses... and were automatically configured and just worked. Here's a list of all of the container OS Templates they offer on x86:

centos 6 amd64 default 20160205_02:16 
centos 6 i386 default 20160205_02:16 
centos 7 amd64 default 20160205_02:16 
debian jessie amd64 default 20160204_22:42 
debian jessie i386 default 20160204_22:42 
debian sid amd64 default 20160207_11:58 
debian sid i386 default 20160204_22:42 
debian squeeze amd64 default 20160204_22:42 
debian squeeze i386 default 20160204_22:42 
debian wheezy amd64 default 20160204_22:42 
debian wheezy i386 default 20160204_22:42 
fedora 21 amd64 default 20160205_01:27 
fedora 21 i386 default 20160205_01:27 
fedora 22 amd64 default 20160205_01:27 
fedora 22 i386 default 20160205_01:27 
gentoo current amd64 default 20160205_14:12 
gentoo current i386 default 20160205_14:12 
opensuse 12.3 amd64 default 20160205_00:53 
opensuse 12.3 i386 default 20160205_00:53 
oracle 6.5 amd64 default 20160205_11:40 
oracle 6.5 i386 default 20160205_11:40 
plamo 5.x amd64 default 20160207_11:59 
plamo 5.x i386 default 20160207_13:13 
ubuntu precise amd64 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu precise i386 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu trusty amd64 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu trusty i386 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu trusty ppc64el default 20160201_03:49 
ubuntu vivid amd64 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu vivid i386 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu wily amd64 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu wily i386 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu xenial amd64 default 20160205_03:49 
ubuntu xenial i386 default 20160205_03:49

The first one shows the basics of LXC installation on Fedora 23 (per their wiki page on the subject) as well as creating a Debian SID container, getting it going, installing a lot of software on it including XFCE and most common desktop software... and accessing it via X2Go... and configuring XFCE the way I like it. This one was made on my home laptop and my network is a bit slow so I cut out a few long portions where packages were downloading and installing but everything else is there... yes including quite a bit of waiting for stuff to happen.

lxc-on-fedora-23-debian-sid-GUI-container.webm (25 MB, ~41.5 minutes)

The second video is very similar to the first but it is a remote ssh session with my work machine (where the network is way faster) and shows making a CentOS 7 container, installing XFCE and the same common desktop software, and then connecting to it via X2Go using an ssh proxy, and configuring XFCE how I like it. It was done in a single, un-edited take and includes a bit of waiting as stuff downloads and installs... so you get the complete thing from start to finish.

lxc-on-fedora-23-centos-7-GUI-container.webm (22.7 MB, ~31 minutes)

I recorded the screencasts with vokoscreen at 25 frames-per-second @ slightly larger than 720p resolution... and then converted them to webm (vp9) with ffmpeg @ 200kbit video. They compressed down amazing well. I recommend playback in full-screen as the quality is great. Enjoy!

Video: The Mystery of Dan Walsh

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Thu, 08/27/2015 - 17:21

Everyone knows Red Hat's Dan Walsh as the SELinux guy... and more recently as the guy who pronounces Docker in a Boston accent as "Dockah". Turns out he was the subject of a recent TNT Network's Rizzoli and Isles episode. Enjoy. Oh, and, "All roads lead... to Dan Walsh." (the missing last 3 seconds)

For those with iFrame issues, here's the direct link:
dan-walsh-mystery.webm

Video: Super Privileged Containers

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 07/17/2015 - 10:55

For anyone who hasn't seen this yet who is interested in containers, this is a must see. Watch Red Hat's SELinux guru Dan Walsh explain and demo Super Privileged Containers from the Red Hat Summit 2015. Enjoy!

For those who are iFrame challenged, here's the direct YouTube link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dM2Fc53Dtd4