Fedora

Wherefore Art Thou CentOS 8?

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Wed, 09/11/2019 - 15:04

IBM's Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (and I'm not sure if Red Hat likes me putting IBM in front of it or not) was released on May 7th, 2019.  I write this on Sept. 11th, 2019 and CentOS 8 still isn't out.  RHEL 7.7 came out on August 6, 2019.  In an effort to be transparent, CentOS does have wiki pages for both Building_8 and Building_7 where they enumerate the various steps they have to go through to get the final product out the door.

Up until early August they were making good progress on CentOS 8.  In fact they had made it to the last step which was titled, "Release work" which had a Started date of "YYYY-MM-DD", an Ended date of "YYYY-MM-DD", and a Status  "NOT STARTED YET".  That was fine for a while and then almost a month had passed with the NOT STARTED YET status.  If you are like me, when they completed every step but the very last, you are thinking that the GA release will be available Real-Soon-Now but after waiting a month, not so much.

It was also obvious that CentOS had started work on the 7.7 update and the status indicators for that have progressed nicely but they still have a ways to go.  Of course one of the hold ups is that they have quite a few arches to support (more than Red Hat themselves) even though their most used platform (x86_64) had its Continuous Release (CR) repository populated and released on August 30th, 2019.  There is still a ways to go on 7.7 but they are generally much quicker with the point update releases.

Users started complaining on the CentOS Devel mailing list harkening back to an earlier time in CentOS' history where they lagged way behind.  There were lots of responses to that thread, many thanking the CentOS developers for all of their hard work, some name calling, and a lot of back and forth with plenty of repetition.  Everyone understands that it takes a while for a major new release to come out and it'll be done when it is good and ready... however... the main complaint was that the development team (which long-time CentOS developer Johnny Hughes Jr. said numbered 3 people) wasn't being transparent enough given the fact that the wiki pages hadn't been updated in some time.  Johnny Hughes finally explained the reason 8 has stalled:

WRT CentOS 8 .. it has taken a back seat to 7.7.1908.  Millions of users already use CentOS Linux 7.  Those people needs updates.

That totally makes sense, doesn't it?  Everyone was happy with that answer... and I updated the Building_8 wiki page to reflect that by changing the status to, "Deferred for 7.7 work" and adding a note that said, "2019-09-10 According to this thread, work was stopped on CentOS 8 after upstream released 7.7. Since so many more users have CentOS 7.x in production, and no one has 8 yet, priority has been given to the 7.7 update... and once it is done, work will continue on 8."

Someone asked JH Jr. if they could use some help and he said that building the packages was easy enough and there wasn't really a way to speed it up... but testing all of the packages, especially all of the various arches, was a way the greater community could help.  That was a poor summary so if interested I encourage you to read the full thread.

While I'm definitely looking forward to the release of CentOS 8, I understand the 7.7 release takes priority and I now better know what to expect.  As has been said so many times, thanks for all of the hard work devs, it is appreciated.

Civility in a systemd World

Submitted by Putz3000 on Thu, 08/23/2018 - 22:48

Let me just say that I don't really know much of anything about systemd and as such, I'm not even sure I care. I know that people either like systemd or really, really, hate systemd and that there is a very slim slice of global users that don't care one way or the other. I also know that literally everything in life can be turned into a punchline joke if you link it to systemd. You don't even have to understand the specifics of the joke, you just know that if systemd is part of the punch line that you are supposed to laugh. Now after all that, here is the real reason for this post.

I was listening to episode 262 of the Linux Unplugged podcast in which there is a discussion of Benno Rice's BSDCan 2018 keynote called "The Tragedy of systemd."  First, the discussion was really, really good and certainly thought provoking. I would highly recommend listening to the discussion.  It was interesting enough that I had to go and actually find the keynote presentation and watch it in it's entirety.  Remember what I said at the start of this post, I don't really know anything about systemd nor do I know if I even care.  And yet I am willing to say it was a very good presentation.

What I think really made this a good presentation was that Benno discusses the type of impact our public systemd stances can have on a project and on a community (think Linux) as a whole.  So I would like to encourage all of you to listen to episode 262 of Linux Unplugged podcast and watch Benno Rice's BSDCan 2018 keynote.  Who knows?  Even if you don't change your opinion of systemd, you might just change how you publicly use your opinion of systemd.

Years and Years of Linux Journal...

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 12/01/2017 - 12:25

Update: On Jan. 1st, 2018 Linux Journal published an update on their website stating that they had a new investor that was bringing them back to life.  Long live Linux Journal.

I got an email from Linux Journal today.  It announced that they were ceasing publication because they were broke.

I've been a long-time subscriber.  How long?  Well, I started using Linux in January of 1995... and only found out about the existence of Linux Journal some months after that.  I don't recall the exact month I subscribed but it was probably sometime in late 1995 or early 1996.  Early on they were every-other-month but it didn't take them very long before they went monthly.  I continued renewing my subscription every year... although I think there might have been a few, fairly short, accidental late renewals where I might have missed an issue or two.  Whenever that happened I was sure to check the newstand (aka Barnes and Noble).

I remember early on (1996?) they were based in Seattle... and it just so happened that my family and I would periodically visit Seattle for days and sometimes weeks at a time because my first son was born with kidney problems and the Seattle Children's Hospital was his regional pediatric care facility.  Staying in Seattle for periods of time you look for stuff to do... and I decided to find their offices and pay them a visit.  In those days it wasn't too far from the University district.  On my first visit I was able to buy most all of the back issues that came out before I was a subscriber going back to issue #2.  They had long sold out of issue #1 (dated March 1994) as it obviously had the lowest print run anyway... so I never actually saw a physical issue #1... but I saw all of the rest of them.  I believe I visited their Seattle office at least 3 times.  They had tee-shirts and various other branded items one could buy.  I do remember getting one or two tee-shirts.

I also saw a Linux Journal booth at various Linux-related conferences I have attended over the years.  I was always sure to grab a few copies of the current issue they would giving away to share with my fellow LUG members.

A few years ago they went digital-only (August 2011).  I never missed an issue because they allowed access to all back issues they offered in PDF format... which goes back to issue #132 dated April 2005.  Their last issue was #283 dated November 2017.  I have the bulk of my print issues sitting on a shelf in front of my desk at work.

In the email from today they said that they were unfortunately not going to be able to give  subscribers a refund for any remaining undelivered issues.  That's fine.  I don't even know how many issues were left on my last subscription.  As a parting gift they were able to provide a link to 6 free issues of Linux Pro magazine... as well as a download link for the final Linux Journal Archive optical disc which contains every issue, now including the last one... in HTML format.  That is normally a $25 value.  I downloaded it.  They said the download was good until the end of the year... at that point I assume their website and everything else will be dismantled to stop any additional financial burden on them.

Linux Journal you will be missed! 1994-2017

Video: Recording a screencast within an LXC container

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 22:00

I took the GUI Fedora 26 container I made in the previous video and decided to see if I could do screencasting within the container.  Seems to work just fine.  I think the microphone would have worked within the container if I hadn't been using it on the host to record the video on the host of recording a video within a container.  Inception all over again.  Enjoy!

Higher resolution / quality downloadable version:
lxc-screencasting-20170908.webm (4m:34s, 35.2MB)

Video: LXC, from Start to Finish

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 21:14

LXC is a native form of containers available in the mainline Linux kernel for several years now.  Unlike Docker, LXC provides a full "system" container and can even be used for GUI desktop environments.

In this video I show how to install and setup LXC on a Fedora 26 host as well as how to create your first container (also Fedora 26) which is very minimal... and how to build it up via package manager to a complete GUI container including video and audio playback accessed via the x2go remoting protocol that runs over ssh.

I have also made GUI containers of other distributions including CentOS 7, Ubuntu 16.04, Debian 9, and OpenSUSE 42.3... using the pre-made OS Templates shown listed in the video... using their native packages managers, mostly the same packages, and all running systemd and accessible via x2go.

Screencast recorded under Fedora 26 with simplescreenrecorder from the rpmfusion repository.

I did make a few minor mistakes and typos along the way, but making mistakes is how we learn, right?

Higher resolution / quality downloadable version:
lxc-start-to-finish-20170908.webm (34m:19s, 196MB)

Fedora Release Time: Welcome F26

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Sat, 07/08/2017 - 18:40

There was a GO / NO GO meeting earlier in the week and the Fedora 26 RC 1.5 build passed.  As a result Fedora 26 will be officially released on Tuesday, July 11th.  According to the original schedule, F26 was set to be released on June 6th.  It got bumped 5 times during the alpha and beta phases but that pretty much always happens to this distro that is constantly leading the pack with innovation. 

What are the new features?  Check out the release notes and/or the changeset.  There are quite a few changes to the installer. Just be aware there are a ton of normal updates beyond the changeset and I mean... how about that new desktop background?  LXQT users will also be happy to have their own Spin now.  Don't forget that Fedora appears to be supporting quite a few arches, some as primary and others as secondary.  Not as many as Debian and Gentoo but still.  Which arches?  aarch64, armhfp, i386, ppc64, ppc64le, and x86_64.  I'm only using the later myself.

I've been using Fedora 26 since before the alpha release.  How is that?  For many years now they have been producing nightly-builds if you knew where to look.  I just took one of the nightly builds and did an install... and then crawled along updating all the way through alpha and beta to final.  I mainly start early because I like to build my own remix with all of the desktop environments installed and the earlier I start the longer I have to work on perfecting it to my own tastes.  Here's some instructions if you have any desire to make your own spin or remix.  About the time the beta came out I started running F26 on my laptop and work machine exclusively.  It has been stable for me the entire time.

My main home server machine is always the last to move to a new release and I just upgraded to F26 from F25 today.  Since I have a lot of packages installed it did take a while.  Let it be known that rpmfusion has had packages for F26 since around the alpha release and as a result I was able to just upgrade everything and not have to worry about removing much because third-party packages were missing... because they weren't.  For a long time I have been a fan of clean installs but with the home server I have a particular application installed that has to pull down a ton of data post install if I were to do a clean install (plexmediaserver)... so I've been upgrading that machine with each release for quite a few releases now.  Upgrades for me have been completely painless for several releases now.  It helps when Linux / Fedora likes your hardware and you aren't using any proprietary drivers (no nVidia here).

Fantastic job Fedora Project!  I also wanted to give a shout out to the fine fellows that make up the Respin SIG.  They have been providing updated iso media for all of the Fedora Spins (including Workstation) for several releases now and generally make new ones every other kernel update, which in Fedora is quite often.  I'm not sure everyone knows about the periodic refreshed media that they provide because they are mainly only promoted on Fedora Planet and the Fedora IRC channel.  Keep up the good work!  There are a ton up post-release updates for Fedora 26 already so I'm sure they'll be getting to work on refreshed F26 media RSN.

FedBerry 25 on the Raspberry Pi 3

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Sat, 01/21/2017 - 19:24

FebBerry LogoI've been running FedBerry 24 on my Rasperry Pi 3 for some time now.  It has been hooked up to the HDTV in the back bedroom.  While I don't use it on a daily basis, I do try to login to it once a week or so and keep it updated... and reboot whenever there is a kernel update. Given the rate of Fedora updates and frequent FedBerry kernel updates, the project is fairly active.

What is FedBerry?  FedBerry is a Fedora-remix made by three guys who have built glue packages for Fedora's ARM release and produced a few different images for the RPi 2 and Pi 3.  Download the .tar.xz, decompress and write it to a microSD card, insert card into Raspberry Pi... and snap... you have Fedora.  They started with Fedora 23, are on Fedora 24 now, and fairly recently released packages for Fedora 25... although no images for Fedora 25 yet.

As I write this, I'm in the middle of upgrading my F24 system to F25.  The number of packages the FedBerry folks have to produce is pretty small.  They are mostly related to the kernel and various branding packages.  It really isn't that far away from Fedora's ARM build.  Fedora has said that they are working on getting a release to run on the Raspberry Pi but historically there have been a few roadblocks that over time have been dissolving.  The main ones were with kernel support that wasn't in mainline and/or proprietary and the use of the FAT filesystem for the boot partition... or something like that.  I read a few blog posts on it a couple of months ago but don't remember the exact details.

Anyhoo, I run XFCE and a host of other common desktop software on the RPi3 and it works great.  While it is no speed demon, all of the hardware works including the wifi.  I can ssh into it and even connect to it via x2go for a remote XFCE session.  Overall, I'm very impressed with FedBerry.

I will update this post with info on how the upgrade went.  The FedBerry devs didn't announce their F25 packages, or at least not that I saw, but I noticed a 25 directory on their repo site and thought I'd stick my neck out.  If it fails on me, it would really be my fault for being a earlier-than-early adopter... but so far it seems to be working.

Update: The upgrade went fine.  Rebooted and had a 4.9.2 Linux kernel. FB24 had 4.4.41.  All the hardware continues to work fine.  Thanks FedBerry!

The method I used was: dnf system-upgrade download --nogpgcheck --releasever=25 followed by dnf system-upgrade reboot

Video: KVM within KVM, aka Nested

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Fri, 04/01/2016 - 13:51

A few of us were talking about VDI and KVM in IRC and our buddy kaptk2 told me that nested KVM was working pretty well these days... since Fedora 19 he said.  I had not tried it yet so I thought I'd give it a try.  It worked so well that I thought I'd make a screencast showing it off. The original recording size was 1920x1080 (plus titlebar) and I scaled it down to 1280x734... so full-screen it for a better view beyond the embedded 824x473 video.  Oh, and yes SELinux is enabled and in enforcing mode everywhere.  Umm, and NO, this is NOT an April fools joke!

There is a tiny bit of work to do to get it going but not much.  Add a kernel boot parameter and configure the CPU details for the VM.  For more info, see this:
https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_to_enable_nested_virtualization_in_KVM


nested-kvm-on-fedora-23.webm (21 minutes, 21.5 MB)

Video: Comparing Fedora 23 and Korora 23 (Cinnamon)

Submitted by Scott Dowdle on Wed, 03/30/2016 - 17:13

A user with the IRC nick of CoffeeMan wanted to know how Fedora 23 and Korora 23 (Cinnamon edition) compared for resource usage because he was seeing performance differences between the two.  There shouldn't really be much in the way of differnces other than branding and themes... so I created two KVM VMs and installed them both side-by-side.  While I realize that running two VMs at the same time isn't really that bright when it comes to getting accurate performance metrics, it at least gives one an idea how of they compare... and things like the number of processes, CPU usage, RAM used, disk used, etc... shouldn't really vary that much.

While it is a fairly boring, not-much-action video, at least it is small.  28+ minutes at about 16.4 MB.  It is 200Kbit (variable bit-rate) with no audio with a resolution of 1280x491 at 25FPS.  Not too bad.  I have made the default size in the browser be 824x316 so go full screen for a much better view.

fedora23-vs-korora23-resource-usage.webm (28.5 minutes - 16.4 MB)